Fairy Tales

On a cool night in midsummer, while the fireflies danced their ancient dances over the river and a pack of deer, emboldened by the protection of the full moon, grazed in the meadow, a baby was born in the thatched hut by the dell.

The unlikelihood of this wondrous event was commented on widely by the fairy folk who made their home in the dell. It was the first human birth to occur so close to their own realm in over a thousand years, and the community was abuzz with talk for several days.

It was not the fact that a baby was born which they found so astonishing. After all, babies are born all the time, to practically everything, everywhere. No, it was the fact that out of the millions of people who could have resulted from the union of the man and the woman in the hut, on the millions of days and nights that the baby could have been born, in what was only one of surely millions of places, this exact baby was born on this exact night in this exact place.

To call such an event improbable was a gross understatement. A miracle, the fairy folk agreed, something like magic, was a much more appropriate term for it. They wondered that the man and woman in the hut, while happy with their new bairn, did not seem to be in awe of it as they should. But then again, the fairy folk considered, humans had very strange points of view about these types of things.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

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About rsjeffrey

A thinly published author who is widely read. No type of fiction is off limits, and I even enjoy plunging into the odd, well-written nonfiction tome as well. I am driven by a need to continuously move forward, so expect to see a lot of activity from me!
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3 Responses to Fairy Tales

  1. Terri Jeffrey says:

    Is there more coming? I hope so…I’m intrigued!

  2. Pingback: Fairy Tales (Part 2) | Simple Complexities

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