Tag Archives: Non-Fiction

“Taking a Drink from a Fire Hydrant”: How Do We Find Information? (Part 3 of 4)

There are many models, paradigms, and theories discussed in the field of library and information science that are used to interpret and define the information behavior of the everyday user. The results from these analyses provide information that has the … Continue reading

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“Taking a Drink from a Fire Hydrant”: How Do We Find Information? (Part 2 of 4)

It is helpful first to view the information that was present in every part of my experience as existing in the three typologies that are posited by Brenda Dervin in her “sense making” school of thought. While other typologies do exist, … Continue reading

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“Taking a Drink from a Fire Hydrant”: How Do We Find Information? (Part 1 of 4)

I cannot imagine a time in my life when I will want to stop learning. It’s unfathomable to me that anyone could ever reach such a point. In the so-called “age of information” in which I grew up, it seems … Continue reading

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A Moral-less “Down and Out”

George Orwell’s Down and Out in Paris and London takes us out of the 18th and 19th century and catapults us into the ‘modern’ age of the 20th. Just as in Moll Flanders, the story laid out in Down and … Continue reading

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Movement

Moving is hard for writers. I think it’s hard for everyone, of course, but being a writer and moving presents a unique set of problems that I’m not sure everyone else experiences, or at least experiences to the same extent. … Continue reading

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The Novel Form

One of the things that stand out the most while reading Henry Fielding’s Jonathan Wild, is how differently it is formatted from other works from the same period. Granted, The Beggar’s Opera is a play and thus formatted accordingly. But Moll Flanders, while … Continue reading

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Sophocles’ Religion

Sophocles devotion to his Athenian religion is reflected in the play Oedipus the King, illuminating the work’s overall meaning. Examining man’s responsibility for his own moral sanctity and his own sanity, Sophocles at the same time recognizes that in order … Continue reading

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“The Crazy Apollo Business…”

“Apollo 1 patch” by NASA – http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/apollo/apollo1/html/s66-36742.html (direct link). Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons. William Hines’ editorial, End of a Crazy Business, shows little more than Hines complete lack of understanding of what the Apollo space program achieved … Continue reading

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Lacan, Doyle, and Holmes: Men and the Feminine (Part 3 of 3)

From the start, the differences between the Lacanian interpretation of the Oedipal Triangle and the one presented by Doyle become evident. Women are placed first in the position of the males in the triangle, not always possessing sight but always possessing … Continue reading

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Lacan, Doyle, and Holmes: Men and the Feminine (Part 2 of 3)

Lacan presents a theory that, while engaging, relies on a relatively narrow-minded definition of feminine characteristics versus masculine characteristics. For Lacan, the feminine is a shadowy, deceptive form, both indefinable and irresistible. However, it is still a position of vulnerability, … Continue reading

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